AMD Is Serious About Its Updated RX GPU Series


What is the level of nerd you have to be to require a standalone graphics card on your personal computer? Probably, the type of nerds who love PC gaming so much they want to make the very very most out of their shiny new copy of Rise of the Tomb Raider (who wouldn’t?). Or, as something I understand the process of, minutely, we could take a gander at the pros who edit videos on the fly. The process of rendering huge multimedia files is something else, and it could take hours if you don’t have some good hardware on board (plus a pretty nice desktop monitor). Realistically speaking, these add up to quite the amount of computer users. While you’re wondering what the point of discussing this type of extensive computer components is, it’s for AMD. The company that really knows what’s best when it comes to that heavy line between those who need a luxurious-level video card and those who don’t, has announced a new graphics card series that is definitely going to fit the brand of PC professionals that require not only additional cores, but those pushed clocking speeds for their work.

So, actually not a brand new card series, just a fully refreshed launch of its midrange cards, including the RX 550, 560, 570, and 580 (an upgrade from the RX 460, and 470 GPUs from a year back), AMD has been showing off these Radeon RX graphics cards lately. Included is a lovely compliment to the AMD Ryzen 5 CPU processors, with a an entire base on the the Polaris graphics from the 400’s from last year.

While the AMD RX 550 from last year was likely to help upgrade those with old computers, or even perform as the platform for a nice cheap self-made video card (it was priced at $80), it really became the one to beat. It wasn’t made to make folks crave its performance equity, rather enjoy the low price that actually cannot be beat. Hence the new 550, said to perform as a handy upgrade for off-the-shelf PCs, and featuring 1180MHz boost clock, 2GB of GDDR5 memory, and a 128-bit interface.

Next, the RX 560, ideally seen as an upgrade for gaming nerds, or those running integrated graphics, is probably a bit similar to the RX 570, which, in turn, has a significant performance-power curve to the RX 580. Sometimes it’s hard to detail the exact differences, but to know for a fact that this range of GPUs are providing an improvement of at least “12 percent”, whilst providing cooling fan solutions to be colder and all the while, more quiet, are all good to know. All in all, this isn’t the most exciting story, but the choice AMD made in this new series release was partially to have an entire new set for the new year. In that, although it’s nothing radical enough to ensure an upgrade from anything you might already own, but they will most definitely provide a smooth gaming experience, lovely HD graphics, and with the 580’s specs estimating the utmost power and largest upgrade from its sibling, the RX 470 predecessor.

All in all, this isn’t the most exciting story, but the choice AMD made in this new series release was partially to have an entire new set for the new year. In that, although it’s nothing radical enough to ensure an upgrade from anything you might already own, but they will most definitely provide a smooth gaming experience, lovely HD LCD screen graphics, and with the 580’s specs estimating the utmost power and largest upgrade from its sibling, the RX 470 predecessor. The end of the story includes the pricing. Quotes for the RX 580 and 570 are launching for $229 and $169, respectively, for 8GB versions. The RX 560 ($110) and 550 ($80) are of course also in the basket of options, but, if you dig in, and consider all the details of the RX 550, that price tag is going to continue to wail in comparison.

Topics: Technology News AMD Desktop PCs Display Screen Technology Gadgets & Peripherals

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